COURSE PODCAST CLIP: Episode 6

Every other Wednesday we publish a new episode of the Equipped for Life Podcast, available to everyone who purchases our course, “Equipped for Life: A Fresh Approach to Conversations about Abortion.” Generally, these podcast episodes won’t be available to the general public, but we plan on releasing short clips from the episodes every Thursday, to give you a sense of what these podcasts are like.

In episode six of the Equipped for Life Course Podcast, Tim explains the problems with results-oriented reasoning, or evaluating decisions on the basis of the results.

Download Audio MP3 | 00:09:15

In these clips from the full episode, you’ll hear a brief summary of Tim’s argument and two thought-experiments illustrating the point.

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ERI Update – September 2017

Download Audio MP3 | 00:14:11

I give an update on the main things that have been going on at ERI in the last month and what we’re working on next.

Click here to listen to the radio interview I did on the Ask Dr. Brown show.

Click here to download the course clips that we’ve already released.

Click here to subscribe to our email list.

Click here to email Kim with your mailing address if you want to get our quarterly newsletters in the mail.

Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

PODCAST: Q&A Session with Rock for Life Activists – Part 2

Download Audio MP3 | 01:42:12

Two months ago I spent about four hours in two sessions answering questions from Rock for Life activists before their outreach tour this summer. This is the audio from the second of those two sessions. Click here for the audio from the first session.

I’ll list the topics below in case you want to jump around:

COURSE PODCAST CLIP: Episode 5

Every other Wednesday we publish a new episode of the Equipped for Life Podcast, available to everyone who purchases our course, “Equipped for Life: A Fresh Approach to Conversations about Abortion.” Generally, these podcast episodes won’t be available to the general public, but we plan on releasing short clips from the episodes every Thursday, to give you a sense of what these podcasts are like.

In episode five of the Equipped for Life Course Podcast, Tim gives a fuller explanation of the argument that I presented in the course about avoiding burden of proof shifts, and responds to counter-arguments.

Download Audio MP3 | 00:06:43

In this clip from the full episode, Tim explains a pragmatic reason to not be quick to shift the burden of proof and responds to a counter-argument.

Click here to subscribe to the ERI podcast in iTunes.

Updated Comments Policy

UPDATE: One of our original changes included turning off guest commenting to make it easier to enforce our comments policy. Unfortunately this had the unintended side effect of virtually banning several or our commenters who are uncomfortable with creating Disqus accounts. So we did some googling and came to believe that we can still attempt to enforce the policies while allowing guest commenting. Given that, we’ve reinstating guest commenting abilities on our blog.

We’ve updated our comments policy to be more clear about what is and is not okay in comments on our blog. Because of the update above, there is only one change, which is an extended section on what is and isn’t allowed:

The goal of the comments section on this blog is simply and unambiguously to promote productive dialogue. But there is a major obstacle to that goal: the internet is a terrible place for dialogue. People are much more inclined to be poor at dialogue and impossible to reason with on the internet. Our solution is to ruthlessly and without warning ban anyone that is engaging in poor dialogue activity (as outlined below) for the good of all. The result of this is that some people we ban will not appreciate or agree with it. That is unavoidable. Some of these calls will be a simple matter of our discretion. If you want to debate people in a free-for-all environment where you can say anything you want, go to almost any other part of the internet. If you want to dialogue respectfully, charitably, and reasonably, we hope you’ll find this to be a helpful place to seek truth with us. Examples of bannable bad dialogue activity include (but is not limited to): being snarky, disrespectful, off-topic, libelous, flagrantly uncharitable, defamatory, abusive, harassing, threatening, profane, pornographic, offensive, false, misleading, or which otherwise violates or encourages others to violate my sense of decorum and civility or any law, including intellectual property laws; or (d) “spam,” i.e., an attempt to advertise, solicit, or otherwise promote goods and services. You may, however, post a link to your site or your most recent blog post.