PODCAST: Four Practical Tips for Responding to the Burning Fertility Clinic

Download Audio MP3 | 00:10:17

A couple months ago, a series of tweets about abortion went viral. They used the pro-choice argument involving a burning fertility clinic thought experiment. As a pro-life advocate who occasionally gets questions about abortion issues, I received questions about this thought experiment from maybe 20 different individuals.

For some reason, pro-choice people tend to think this argument demolishes the pro-life view, so it’s important to be ready to respond to it efficiently (meaning you need to focus on just a couple of disanalogies, not all of them) and persuasively (meaning you need to convince them that you aren’t just weaseling out of a problem with your view). My focus in this piece is practical dialogue—how to respond to this argument in a way that pro-choice people are most likely to find compelling.

Related Links:

  • Click here for the series of tweets that went viral
  • Click here to buy Robert George and Christopher Tollefsen’s book Embryo: A Defense of Human Life
  • Click here for the article by Robert George

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PODCAST: Planned Parenthood’s Absurd Position on HIV Disclosure

Download Audio MP3 | 00:10:27

This piece is an unofficial part 3 to the pieces about my conversation with Brent. Those articles ended up touching on the important issue of the role of the right to sex in the argument for abortion. When I came upon an article about Planned Parenthood’s view on whether or not someone has an obligation to disclose HIV to a sexual partner, I saw the connection and thought it was worth pointing out.

Related Links:

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On Virtue-Signaling

I regularly hear people complain about Virtue-Signaling, but I haven’t yet found a balanced attempt to clarify what it is and what it isn’t. Mostly I’ve noticed that people are quick to accuse people outside of their own political tribes of doing it. Without any definitions, how is a fair-minded person to distinguish between appropriate critiques and partisan smears?

Another problem is that I’ve long felt that some virtue-signaling is not actually morally objectionable, but I never see people make distinctions to allow for that. It’s just an accusation, and an inherently irrefutable one at that. I’d like to offer some distinctions between types of Virtue-Signaling with the hope that people will be able to distinguish the objectionable types from the acceptable types. I’ll close with suggestions about how and when to accuse someone of Virtue-Signaling, all with the desired end of helping dialogue to be more productive between parties that disagree.

What is Virtue-Signaling?

Virtue-Signaling is always referred to in a negative way, but given that the term itself is etymologically neutral, my recommended definition is intentionally neutral in order to minimize confusion:

virtue signal
noun

  1. to give an indication that you have a particular virtue (usually, though not necessarily, through a statement).

PODCAST: Is Abortion Justified by an Inalienable Right to Sex?

Download Audio MP3 | 00:10:06

This is a continuation of my previous post “Four Practical Dialogue Tips from My Conversation with Brent.” That piece was focused on specific dialogue strategies I used in that conversation. This one is focused on a major aspect of Brent’s view that we were able to get into in detail: the role of sex, the right to it, and how that interacts with his pro-choice view.

Related Links:

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PODCAST: Four Practical Dialogue Tips from My Conversation with Brent

Download Audio MP3 | 00:14:50

A couple years ago, I had a conversation with a student that I call Brent. This conversation became very useful as a teaching tool. He was a very interesting person and we had a long conversation that allowed us to cover a lot of material. I was also able to test some of my new ideas during this conversation. I wrote two blog posts about my conversation with Brent. This is the first.

Related Links:

  • Click here for the paper De Facto Guardian and Abortion
  • Click here for a speech Josh Brahm gave on the topic of responding to bodily rights arguments

Click here to share the original article.

Click here to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes!